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Prepare Named boot File on Solaris

For your convenience, here are the steps you followed to kill the name server process and edit the named.boot file on a Solaris machine:
  1. The first thing you need to do is stop the in.named process so that you can configure it with the named.boot file. Before you can do that, however, issue the following command to learn the PID of the in.named process:
    ps -ef | grep in.named
    
  2. Notice that the in.named process has the PID of 229. Kill the in.named process, stopping it completely.
    Solution: kill -TERM 229
  3. You have stopped the in.named process on your system. View the /etc/named.boot file using the cat command.
  4. The name of this file shows you that you are using an older version of BIND, which is still quite common. Newer versions of BIND use the /etc/named.conf file. For the purpose of this simulation, we have set up the proper primary directives, one for the forward zone file and one for the reverse zone file.


Basic Boot PROM Commands

When the system is turned on or reset, it first runs POST, and then one of the following two things can happen:
  1. The system will automatically reboot if the value of the configuration variable auto-boot? is true, the value of the boot-command variable is boot, and OpenBoot is not in diagnostic mode. In order to boot, the system will automatically load, and executes the program and its arguments specified by the boot-file variable from the device described by the boot-device variable.
  2. If the configuration variable auto-boot? is false, the system may stop at the OpenBoot user interface without booting the system and will display the ok prompt.

You can issue the Boot PROM commands at the ok prompt. One obvious command is the boot command to boot the system, which you can use in one of the following ways:
  1. Issue the boot command without any arguments if you want to boot the system from the default boot device using the default boot arguments.
  2. Issue the boot command with an explicit boot device as an argument if you want to boot the system from the specified boot device using the default boot arguments.
  3. Issue the boot command with explicit boot arguments if you want to boot the system from the default device by using the specified arguments.
  4. Issue the boot command with an explicit boot device and with explicit arguments if you want to boot the system from the specified device with the specified arguments.

The general syntax of the boot command is shown here:
boot [<device>] [<arguments>]

Arguments and options are described here:
<device>. Specifies the full path or the alias for the boot device. The typical values are:
  1. cdrom for CD-ROM drive
  2. disk for hard disk
  3. floppy for 3.5 inch diskette drive
  4. net for network
  5. tape for SCSI tape